Sorry, Daniel West. Airscape: The Fall of Gravity is not a “good” game.

Airscape The Fall of Gravity - Not Good

Last month, game designer and programmer Daniel West wrote a post-mortem on Gamasutra, reflecting on the commercial flop of his four-man team’s game, despite having made what he considered a ‘good game’ and having invested a large amount of time and money into their marketing campaign. In the post, titled ‘Good’ isn’t good enough — releasing an indie game in 2015, Daniel essentially attributes the failure of Airscape: The Fall of Gravity to the current landscape of the gaming industry. An over-competitive market, too many games available, yadda yadda yadda — we’ve all heard it before. But I think this conclusion lacks personal accountability on their part. It merely pushes the blame externally, when Daniel and his team could’ve done something to soften the blow earlier on.

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Live on Kickstarter: “The Land of Eyas” – a puzzle-platformer for PC/Mac/Linux that defies the gravity we know

landofeyas

Due to increased workload at college and to allow for more posting flexibility on my part, I have decided to forgo the only-on-Thursdays schedule for Live on Kickstarter. Any posts under the feature can now appear on any day of the week.

Currently with 43 days to go on its Kickstarter campaign and already at 10% of its goal of USD$10,000, The Land of Eyas (pronounced as ‘eye-uhs’) is Happy Square Productions’ attempt at creating a genuinely unique platformer that stands out from the crowd, with gravity control as its main puzzle-solving mechanic. The game has been in the works since 2012 and contains a unique game engine written from scratch by lead developer Stephen Hoskins, plus hand-crafted drawings from pen-and-ink artist Matthew Kiehl, whose works take inspiration from a number of ancient tribal societies (more info on that here).

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Hong Kong Invasion Update: Farewell, Pac-Man

pacmanFrench urban artist Invader came to Hong Kong and left about 50 pieces around the city before departing for his next project. A few weeks ago, I wrote about the adventures I had while searching for his works around the city. Today, The Standard has reported that “government workers have scrubbed off at least one of the pieces”. A spokeswoman for the Highways Department has stated that this was done to “ensure safety of road users.”

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