Sorry, Daniel West. Airscape: The Fall of Gravity is not a “good” game.

Airscape The Fall of Gravity - Not Good

Last month, game designer and programmer Daniel West wrote a post-mortem on Gamasutra, reflecting on the commercial flop of his four-man team’s game, despite having made what he considered a ‘good game’ and having invested a large amount of time and money into their marketing campaign. In the post, titled ‘Good’ isn’t good enough — releasing an indie game in 2015, Daniel essentially attributes the failure of Airscape: The Fall of Gravity to the current landscape of the gaming industry. An over-competitive market, too many games available, yadda yadda yadda — we’ve all heard it before. But I think this conclusion lacks personal accountability on their part. It merely pushes the blame externally, when Daniel and his team could’ve done something to soften the blow earlier on.

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Funko POP! Marvel: Ant-Man Vinyl Figure Review — Why I can’t trust the Funko name anymore

Ant-Man Funko Box

Life is filled with unplanned events. I went to the Anime-Comic-Game Hong Kong (ACGHK) convention a couple of months ago (this part was planned), never intending to purchase an Ant-Man bobble-head vinyl figure at the Funko POP! booth. And after purchasing said vinyl figure, I never planned to write up a review here on my blog. I only intended for this blog to do reviews on games and tech — I thought expanding to geek merchandise would broaden the scope too far.

But here we are with an unplanned review, of an unintentionally purchased product, for one reason and one reason only: I was extremely disappointed with its quality that I felt the need to create this post. Continue reading

Lost in a Smartphone World — In Defense of “Technophobes”


I’m sure this has become a bit of a common scene for a lot of us nowadays.

I go outside, I see people constantly staring at their smartphones. On buses or trains, I see people furiously tapping away on Facebook or watching a video or two on YouTube. In restaurants, groups of friends would be on some sort of social media app, communicating there instead of with each other. Of course, this doesn’t apply to every single person. But just from mere observation, there’s a large portion of people doing it and the number has been increasing day by day.

I think we should be worried.

Artist Jean Jullien depicts in a number of digital works that are available on his website (you’ll need to scroll through all his posts to find them) this growing reliance on technology and how it’s causing an ironic “disconnect”. A few of these images have been compiled into a Tumblr post that’s been circulating around, which of course attracted the attention of some who defended the behavior.

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